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Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

Waaaatch this entire video it is amazing. It’s not just about privilege, it’s about the reasons behind so much of we’re going through as kids-20somethings (well, not much more on race or sexuality but still good).

I’m SO GLAD cartoon college didn’t/doesn’t have fraternities. :/ Though I still had to listen to guys absurd posturing (because I guess they didn’t realize cubicles aren’t sound proof). On the plus side those guys unintentionally drove a lot of my female classmates to feminism.

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl)

sophiafosterdimino:

I’ve been making these zines for a little over a year now. Here’s #4. I brought 80 copies to SPX this past weekend and gave them to my dear friends. As a bonus I hand-colored all the covers for some bizarre reason

SPX was wonderful as usual. Congratulations to the Ignatz nominees and winners! I picked up a ton of books & zines, and I’ll enjoy reading them over the next few weeks.

The first 3 Sex Fantasy zines are tagged here, so you can read them if you missed them the first time around.

I skimmed through the rest of Ada today (yesterday?) and then tripped upon this blogpost. Their general theory about the nature of Van’s memoir blew my mind. I’d only read Boyd’s analyses of Ada (which I found to be fairly 2-dimensional) and just discovered there’s a lot of people who disagree with his approach.

Obviously gratuitous spoilers about Nabokov’s Ada or Ardor.

Speaking as a botanist and a mad woman, she said, the most extraordinary word in the English language was “husked,” because it stood for opposite things, covered and uncovered, tightly husked but easily husked, meaning they peel off quite easily, you don’t have to tear the waistband, you brute. “Carefully husked brute,” said Van tenderly.

Ada or Ardor, Vladimir Nabokov  (via paintedandlovely)

This book completely destroys me. I got to 1893 (when they get discovered) and accidentally spoiled myself about what happens in 1901. I was so upset I just went “fuck it” and spoiled myself about the rest of the book hoping there was something to bring me back up. …But the book is literally about a person’s memory & passage through time and sense of being in the world. Life doesn’t go the way anyone wants it to, whether or not the main characters end up with the closest thing to a “happily ever after”.

Destroy and forget. ;n; 

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

OH WAIT LEMME TELL YOU ABOUT CECILIA PAYNE.

Cecilia Payne’s mother refused to spend money on her college education, so she won a scholarship to Cambridge.

Cecilia Payne completed her studies, but Cambridge wouldn’t give her a degree because she was a woman, so she said fuck that and moved to the United States to work at Harvard.

Cecilia Payne was the first person ever to earn a Ph.D. in astronomy from Radcliffe College, with what Otto Strauve called “the most brilliant Ph.D. thesis ever written in astronomy.”

Not only did Cecilia Payne discover what the universe is made of, she also discovered what the sun is made of (Henry Norris Russell, a fellow astronomer, is usually given credit for discovering that the sun’s composition is different from the Earth’s, but he came to his conclusions four years later than Payne—after telling her not to publish).

Cecilia Payne is the reason we know basically anything about variable stars (stars whose brightness as seen from earth fluctuates). Literally every other study on variable stars is based on her work.

Cecilia Payne was the first woman to be promoted to full professor from within Harvard, and is often credited with breaking the glass ceiling for women in the Harvard science department and in astronomy, as well as inspiring entire generations of women to take up science.

Cecilia Payne is awesome and everyone should know her.

(via bansheewhale)

korybing:

Extinct Animals of the Cambrian to the Cretaceous!

This will be a limited edition 11x17 print exclusively for sale at spx​ this year!

I love extinct animals, especially lesser-known and non-dinosaur ones. So here are some critters from the Paleozoic through the Mesozoic. Don’t take the period designations too literally, it’s more of a “pretty much around this time” thing, since I couldn’t fit all of them exactly where they should be, scientifically. I’d love to do a sister-image to this with the Cenozoic era!

Here’s a list of the creatures featured!
Cambrian Period
Hallucigenia
Opabinia
Trilobite

Ordovician
Orthoceras

Silurian
Eurypterus
Nektaspida

Devonian
Tiktaalik
Dunkleosteus

Carboniferous
Akmonistion
Pederpes
Arthropleura

Permian
Dimetrodon
Saroctonus

Early Triassic
Erythrosuchus

Middle Triassic
Batrachotomus
Ceresiosaurus

Late Triassic
Oligokyphus

Early Jurassic
Temnodontosaurus

Late Jurassic
Rhamphorhynchus
Pterodactylus
Brachiosaurus
Liopleurodon

Early Cretaceous
Microraptor
Deinonychus
Gobiconodon

Late Cretaceous
Protoceratops
Hesperornis
Corythosaurus